ISO 17972 Colour data exchange format (CxF/X) Gaining traction

Laurel Brunner's picture
Laurel Brunner

ISO’s Technical Committee for graphics technology has over eighty standards in its portfolio of work. However, some of them are more successful than others. One of these is ISO 17972 for the Colour eXchange Format (CxF). This standard is a star because it is being implemented by the graphics industry’s leading hardware and software developers. This means it’s getting widespread use, even if end users might not be aware of it.

The CxF format was originally developed by X-Rite. It was put forward as a standard in 2009 with the goal to support various types of colour data exchange. The original intention was to provide a means of sharing colour data across different colour silos, allowing spectral data to be efficiently conveyed in any context. This would improve colour accuracy and workflow efficiency, but it would also improve data security and sharing options. CxF can be used to exchange data so that data sharing across printing devices is more efficient and reliable. Major software developers such as Alwan, Callas, Global Graphics and Adobe plus hardware developers including Fujifilm, Heidelberg, Konica Minolta, BenQ, Ricoh and X-Rite as well as many others all support the format.

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