Printing textiles

Nessan Cleary's picture
Nessan Cleary

Textile printing has become an increasingly important part of the wide format sector but there are a number of factors to consider.

There’s no question that textile printing has grown considerably over the past couple of years but the term covers several different areas, from display signage through to furnishings and garments. There's little in common between these areas, other than their use of dye sublimation inkjet technology. Most of the growth in textiles is down to the fashion industry having adopted digital technology to print garments, plus a burgeoning home furnishings market. These typically involve industrial printers serving a mass consumer market.

The garment market, and to a less extent the decoration and furnishings sector, work with a range of substrates from cotton to silk, which require specialist inks suitable to these materials, often with both pre-treatment and plenty of washing after printing. Several vendors have developed highly automated industrial machines capable of carrying out those different steps more or less in-line.

Full content is available to subscribers only.

Subscribe NowLearn More

The invaluable source for critical coverage and in-depth analysis of prepress and digital printing technologies

Follow Spindrift on Twitter to be alerted of new content.

Like the Spindrift Facebook page to be alerted of new content.

Join the Spindrift group on LinkedIn to discuss industry topics.

Spindrift.click, like its monthly PDF predecessor takes no advertising. However without the stalwart support of three companies Spindrift would not have been possible. We thank Agfa, Fujifilm and Esko for supporting our subscription model so generously since Spindrift’s inception way back in 2003. We wouldn’t be here without you.

The Verdigris Project investigates the environmental impact of print media and provides information about sustainability initiatives for the international printing community. Keep up to date with the weekly Verdigris blog by Laurel Brunner.